Monitoring Tool in the Cloud in (less than) 2 minutes…


This article will show how to deploy a simple monitoring application in the Cloud in a couple of minutes using statusdashboard and Heroku.

I already introduced StatusDashboard several months ago with a small websocket client I wrote allowing to connect to the web application and streaming monitoring data directly in the terminal. The monitoring data is produced by the server which is periodically trying to call a set of defined services (HTTP, HTTPs, FTP, TCP, UDP, …).

In the last version, you can now embed StatusDashboard in any node application with a really simple to use API. This is especially nice to customize it for your needs, for example, getting settings from a configuration file, from a remote service or whatever:

Let’s deploy it on Heroku…

There is one problem with the current approach: When running such an application on Heroku with the default Heroku Plan, it will ends when nobody browse it. This will stop the monitoring loop which is not really useful for a monitoring app… In order to avoid such behavior, I added a heartbeat mechanism last night which is configured from the application settings. It also needs to define some environment variable with the heroku client. Let’s assume that your application is running on http://YOURAPP.herokuapp.com, you have to define this variable like:

It will restart your application (if not, restart it manually), will start to ping itself and keep the application alive.

The code of this article is available at https://github.com/chamerling/statusdashboard-server. You get fork/clone/whatever and start monitoring your services in the next minutes…

And the proof that it works in less than 2 minutes (with a poor Internet connection, and taking time to browse source code…)

 

Kids are sick? Take coffee and code


I had some time since several nights (thanks kids to be sick…) to start watching how to implement a REST API using node.js (my new friend).

I plan to create an OW2 API this year; but before I started to wrap some existing services as proof of concept. The first feature focuses on how to get projects data from the gitorious instance we run at OW2. There is no clear API for gitorious but after some googling and source code search, it looks that there is a read-only XML API. Since I am targeting node.js, let’s translate this API into a JSON one: xml2js will do the job.

This results in a first library (gitoriou.js) which just call the gitorious instance and translates the XML data into JSON without any other data mapping. The following gist is showing how to get information from a project:

I talked about having a REST API, let’s use express.js for that and let’s run it on Heroku (this platform rules, just took 2 minutes to create, deploy and run the service and it is up at http://ow2apisample.herokuapp.com/).

To get information (as JSON) about the Jasmine project, just HTTP GET http://ow2apisample.herokuapp.com/project/ow2-jasmine

If you master any scripting language, you will be able to get all the repositories URLs from the JSON response, if not you can use the ow2git project to clone them all. Assuming node.js and npm are available on your system (you already have java, ruby and every other stuff installed, why not adding node?), you can install the binary:

npm install -g ow2git

and then clone all the repositories from any gitorious project

ow2git –clone ow2-jasmine

Will clone all the ow2-jasmine repositories into your current folder.

I am really impressed by node.js runtime, tools and community. Even if all of this is just a proof of concept, not really well designed, you can have something running quickly without many effort. Time to get something real. Soon…

2012


OK I am late for the ‘traditional’ past-year summary. So let’s do it short with 4 pictures…

OW2

OW2

I gave several talks at OW2Con 2012 and had fun like every year. I am also proud to be the new OW2 technology council chairman. There is just one thing to say: There are nice things to come this year!

OS X

OS X

I launched several OS X apps, just for fun and to get feedback from new communities. Check them out on the Apps menu. The end of the year has been busy but some updates are almost ready to be published, especially for my favorite app : QuickHub.

Linagora

Linagora, Open Source, Geek life

The big change of the year: Work. PetalsLink has been acquired by Linagora. Some good challenges and nice Open source stuff to develop in this new company. I am also always looking for new challenges and new languages to learn. I started the year with some ObjectiveC/Cocoa stuff as described above, then move to Ruby and finally finished the year with javascript and node.js development which is completely fun and easy to handle for a Java developer like me.

This is the most important thing of the year, no!?

Family

The most important thing of the year. Loris now have a sister: Mila.

Playing with Events in the Cloud


One more video of a talk I gave at OW2Con 2012 about a research project I am working on since two years now called Play (and not the play framework…).

« The PLAY project develops an elastic and reliable architecture for dynamic and complex, event-driven interaction in large highly distributed and heterogeneous service systems.
Such an architecture will enable ubiquitous exchange of information between heterogeneous services, providing the possibilities to adapt and personalize their execution, resulting in the so-called situational-driven process adaptivity… »

What’s new (and not new) with Petals ESB?


Here is the video of a quick talk I gave two weeks ago at OW2Con 2012 dealing with Petals Enterprise Service Bus.

He gives some background about what is Petals, how it can be used, why it is a distributed runtime, what is really new in the last version and finally what is planned in the next version.

I already spent many time explaining what we have in mind to push Petals in the cloud and this will be a reality in the next months as we are currently working on that exiting feature. More information soon, for real this time!